Research is pretty convincing that the best thing we can do for kids is to get them moving! Check out the impact of movement on the brain:
  1. Increased white matter in the corpus collosum. The corpus collosum integrates information between the two hemispheres of the brain and white matter plays a significant role in cognition and behavior.
  2. Increased connections between brain structures. More neural connections results in increased brain efficiency and problem-solving abilities.
  3. Enhanced development in the frontal cortex. The frontal cortex is responsible for most of our executive functioning skills.
  4. Increased neuroplasticity. This is the brain’s ability to continue to change and build itself.
  5. Neurotransmitter balance. Movement increases levels of dopamine, serotonin and other neurotransmitters that help with mood, behavior, and learning.
          Chaddock-Heyman, L., Erickson, K., Kienzler, C., Drollette, E., Raine, L., Kao, S. . . . Kramer, A. F. (2018). Physical activity increases white matter microstructure in children. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 12, 950. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2018.00950
          Jiménez-Maldonado, A., Rentería, I., García-Suárez, P. C., Moncada-Jiménez, J., & Freire-Royes, L. F. (2018). The impact of high-intensity interval training on brain derived neurotrophic factor in brain: A mini-review. Frontiers in neuroscience, 12, 839. https://doi:10.3389/fnins.2018.00839 
          Mualem, R., Leisman, G., Zbedat, Y., Ganem, S., Mualem, O., Amaria, M. . . . Ornai, A. (2018). The effect of movement on cognitive performance. Frontiers in Public Health, 6, 100. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2018.00100

          Valkenborghs, S., Noetel, M., Hillman, C., Nilsson, M., Smith, J., Ortega, F., & Lubans, D. (2019). The impact of physical activity on brain structure and function in youth: A systematic review. Pediatrics, 144(4), e20184032. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2018-4032